Information for Teachers and Trainers

FAQs

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Please note that Maple Bear recruits only Native English speaking candidates for foreign teacher positions, with a preference towards North American trained teachers. While most countries require only a University degree, Maple Bear teachers generally have one or more of the following qualifications, with strong preference for teachers trained in Education and who have classroom experience: Bachelor of Education (BEd), Masters of Education (MEd), TESL/TESOL Certification, Early Childhood Education (ECE), International Teaching Experience, Experience with Youth (Camp, Coaching, Tutoring, etc).

Trainers/Academic Support candidates must hold at least a BEd/MEd and be experienced both in the classroom and in administrative roles (generally 5 years +). Curriculum developers must have proven experience in the creation of Canadian content in the fields of ELA, Math, or Science.

To apply please visit here.

To apply as a local/native language teacher at one of our bilingual locations, please contact the local Maple Bear office or school locations directly or indicate this in "Additional Qualifications" below. A list of local contacts and school locations can be found on our country-specific websites.

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Currently there are more than 120 Maple Bear schools in 9 countries: Korea, China, Singapore, Vietnam, Morocco, Brazil, Mexico, India, and Bangladesh. Our headquarters are located in Vancouver, Canada. You can browse our global locations and visit our regional websites to learn more about any particular market.

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At this time, not all countries hire foreign teachers. We do send highly qualified academic support personnel to various locations globally, but entry-level teaching positions are not available in all areas. Many of our countries offer bilingual programs and utilize experienced local staff to teach both language streams. Our most common teacher destinations for North Americans are South Korea, Vietnam, and China. We have recently begun to hire full-time North American teachers in Brazil. Experience and qualifications of any teacher are considered carefully to match teachers with any location.
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Maple Bear schools hire year-round, and as such we accept resumes anytime. Whether you are applying for an advertised position, or simply would like to be considered for the next available position, we are happy to receive your resume and begin the dialogue. We advise that teachers apply well in advance of when they would like to work abroad as visas and preparation can take some time and varies between countries. Click here to apply now.

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Most schools require that you teach 30 hours per week plus an additional 10 hours per week of preparation time. Schedules vary between locations, but a 9-6 schedule is not uncommon (keeping in mind that you won’t go over the 30 hours in class). Teachers typically work 5 consecutive days per week with two consecutive days off. Most of our schools operate a Monday-Friday schedule, however, some schools offer a Tuesday through Saturday program. Academic support personnel, Directors, Head Teachers, and other positions involving administrative duties will have customized schedules based on the needs of the school
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Teachers are typically housed in single/bachelor apartments located within 5-10 minutes of the school. All teachers live in the vicinity of the school and teachers usually live in the same apartment block or area as their co-workers. Accommodation provided comes semi-furnished with all of the basic amenities you will need to be comfortable. Most units come with: fridge, stove top, air conditioner, washer (most in units, some in building), table, chairs, bed, basic cookware and eating utensils, shower, and bathroom. Utilities are typically paid by the teacher, as well as luxuries such as high speed internet, TV, and phone bills. In most countries these are more reasonably priced that North America. Our Academic Support team members are housed in furnished apartments, and arrangements for transportation will be made with the school.
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Most class sizes are no more than 15 students. In some countries each foreign teacher is paired up with a local teaching aide who will work with them during lesson preparation and in the classroom.
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Maple Bear is a private school system which operates on a franchise model globally. Maple Bear Global Schools Ltd. is based out of Vancouver, BC, Canada, however we collaborate with experts from across Canada in the fields of English Language Arts, Mathematics, and Science to develop the very best curriculum for our students. Maple Bear offers an inquiry-based learning environment to our students, and operate with a student-centred methodology. Maple Bear teachers work in a professional, North American style, teaching environment and we pride ourselves on our professional conduct and ongoing training/development. Teachers are paid competitively, on time, and have a number of supporting academic staff available to help if needed. Maple Bear places experienced North American Academic Directors in nearly all of or schools in order to maintain the high quality of the education programs and teacher development. Quality Assurance visits are conducted by Canadian Education professionals at least annually at each of our schools.
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Certainly! Many of our teachers are planning to work abroad for a number of years, and it is not uncommon for teachers to switch locations in the country they are already working, or to switch and experience teaching in another location. Assuming you are working hard in the classroom and receive a positive recommendation from your Academic Director, Education Services will work with you to find the perfect location for your next adventure. Our experienced Academic Support team often get the opportunity to work for short-term postings in a variety of locations. Maple Bear is continually growing into new markets, and having experienced teachers who have already worked for Maple Bear is an asset to any new school.
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Traveling the world is one of the most exciting experiences you can undertake. Unlike being a tourist in most countries, you are required by law to hold a work visa in the country where you will be teaching. Obtaining a visa is not a hard process although the process can take some time and the steps must be followed accurately. Maple Bear's Education Services works with all teachers and academic support team members to assist them in gathering the appropriate documentation required for the visa application. We recommend gathering your documents early, and getting them processed as quickly as possible as consulates and embassies get bogged down with a high volume of applicants – especially at peak times (such as March and September for teachers bound for South Korea). Documents required generally include transcripts, a valid passport, passport photos, a University degree, a criminal record check, and government-issued health/personal questionnaires. Maple Bear teachers are responsible for gathering their personal documents at home, while the Maple Bear schools will handle the local immigration and Department of Education filings in their respective countries.
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For teaching positions we usually ask for a commitment of one year minimum with full time hours (approximately 30 hours of teaching per week plus 10 hours of prep time). This is to keep consistency in the classroom with our young learners. In some locations that offer weekend programs, part-time positions may be available. Trainers and facilitators, however, are often sent abroad for a shorter contract as their roles are much more complex and specific to a need at a specific school.
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Before you make any decision, think long and hard about your motives for wanting to go. Consider carefully what the benefits of being abroad could be for you. If you are going overseas because a relationship has just broken up, then you are going for the wrong reasons and will probably regret your decision. The more positive reasons you have for going the more likely you will make a success of it. If all you can think of is how much you hate your current job, your boss, even the weather, then you are likely to be as unhappy in your new home as you are now.
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Not everyone is cut out for a life abroad. Living far away from everything that is familiar to you—your life props of home, friends, parents, job, community or church—can be challenging and even painful for some. These feelings will impact on your entire time away. Other people positively thrive on the new challenges, are excited at the idea of exploring a new culture, and feel enormous satisfaction when overcoming any new problem successfully. They feel rewarded with a sense of achievement and personal growth. Do consider carefully what kind of person you are and if living without familiar landmarks or people make you feel uncomfortable or ignite your curiosity.
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If you are very close to your family and friends, you may suddenly find that being without them and their support is very difficult. Is your social life tightly bound with a club, sport, or hobby that isn’t likely to exist in your new destination? Are you hooked on the theater, concerts, and the latest movies? How do you feel about being cut off from this and the fact that you may never be able to quite catch up? Likewise, are there any particular foods you just can’t live without? Are you an adventurous eater in the first place? All of these factors will come into play when you make your life in another country.
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Do you mind being stared at or perhaps followed around by giggling children? If you are living away from the regular tourist haunts and are obviously not a local, you will likely be of considerable interest. Depending on how much other entertainment there is around, you may be the focus of attention. If you are the only foreigner for miles you will stand out, which can be very trying if you sometimes need solitude. While many Maple Bear schools are in well-visited locations, you should prepare for this feeling of standing out.
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In order to be really comfortable with the way day-to-day life is carried out in your host country research and preparation are key. Research should include looking into local laws, customs, taxes, building regulations, the health and education systems, and the public transport system. These will be a part of your everyday life, and in the case of things like the health system, could literally be a life or death issue. Talk to other teachers who have gone before you, and ask them about any unforeseen issues they had to deal with during their first few months in the country.

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And speaking of the first few months…Everyone experiences culture shock in some form or another. Culture shock is an individual’s first reaction to an uncertain and different environment. ‘Culture’ is the new way of life to which you are being exposed; ‘shock’ is your physical and emotional response to that different way of life. In every country of the world, people share a particular view about living. When you move to a new country, that view may be radically different from what you are used to. Always keep this in mind however: in matters of culture, there is no right or wrong, only different.
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Culture shock has a life cycle of its own and can last for several months. First there is the tourist or honeymoon stage. Everything looks interesting, food looks delicious, and places worthy of a photo. When that stage wears off, usually when the day to day hardships set in, the novelty wears off and you hit what is known as the crisis stage. As the name implies, frustration levels rise as you try to communicate often very basic needs. This stage is usually marked by anger at the local culture you initially found to intriguing. It also leads to the third stage, the flight stage which is precisely what the name reflects: you want to run away. Fortunately, you will work your way to the fourth stage, the period of readjustment which marks the end of the culture shock cycle. Like a bad cold, your culture shock magically ends and you manage to create new routines. Remember: culture shock is not fatal.

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Even as you prepare to go, you must give some thought to coming home. You won’t be able to just walk into old friendships as if nothing had changed; you may find you have grown away from some of your friends. Often, parents tell you that now, finally, you must get on with your life. Meanwhile, you feel like a smart fish out of water. Re-entry shock has been described as “the shock of being home. It’s the reverse culture shock you experience in your own country when you visit places that should be familiar to you, but aren’t; try to interact with people you should feel comfortable with, but don’t; or face situations you should be able to handle, but can’t. It is when you feel like you are wearing contact lenses in the wrong eyes. Everything looks almost right.” Luckily, it too has a beginning, a middle and an end.

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